Is There a Connection Between Vitamin D and Breast Cancer?

Breast cancer is the most common cancer of women in the Western world. Many factors contribute to cause a malignant tumor of the breast (it is multifactorial), although heredity is an important issue. Some diets help prevent it, such as diets rich in fruits and vegetables and low in fat. Adequate calcium intake is very important. The role of vitamin D in the deterrence and management of breast cancer are extensively explored by researchers and the results have been promising so far.
No matter what cancer you have, or are trying to prevent, the question is: is cancer left to vitamin D deficiency? Current research shows that a solution to this question is no, women with breast cancer should not meet the expense of to vitamin D deficiency, nor their doctors.
Vitamin D and Breast Cancer: Not a Panacea
If you have breast cancer, please remember that vitamin D is not a panacea and should never be used as the main treatment for cancer. Your oncologist will prescribe a treatment that has proved effective and should carefully follow their advice as the mainstay of treatment. At the same time, you should know that the evidence suggests that adequate vitamin D can help in the fight against the cancer.
Vitamin D and Breast Cancer: Fight against Breast Cancer
Contemporary research indicates that most if not all, women have their vitamin D receptor, except if they were deficient in vitamin D, ie, they have these receptors if they were full of vitamin D. It appears that the receptor is present in breast tissue, where the most active form of vitamin D were present, and this is only true if vitamin D in the form of less-active, calcidiol, were present. In other words, if you are testing vitamin D in breast cancer patients for vitamin D receptors, they will not have much if you treat their disability, they will probably develop these receptors.
Not only calcitriol (a form from the optimal amounts of your body when your vitamin D in blood is ideal) inhibits breast cancer cells to grow, making these cells grow and die as natural cells. In addition, vitamin D inhibits the formation of the large blood vessel growth around the tumor, a progression called anti-angiogenesis.
The first modern connection with cancer and vitamin D is due to an interesting observation was made during the 1930’s. The observation was that people who have spent years in the sun (and later developed a relatively mild form of skin cancer called squamous cell cancer of the skin) were less likely to develop deadly internal cancers such as colon cancer, breast cancer and prostate cancer. This led to early modern theories of cancer, namely that squamous cell skin confers immunity against the most deadly forms of cancer.

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